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  • Hurricane Lorenzo slams into Mexico's Caribbean coast, weakens
    Friday, September 28, 2007


    MIAMI (AFP) - Tropical Storm Lorenzo strengthened into a hurricane and slammed ashore Friday in one of Mexico's oil producing regions, the US National Hurricane Center said, before Lorenzo lost some of its punch.

    Briefly a Category One hurricane -- the lowest on the five-level Simpson-Saffir scale -- Lorenzo then weakened back to tropical storm status over land; at 0500 GMT it was located inland, some 45 kilometers (30 miles) south-southwest of Tuxpan, the Miami-based Hurricane Center reported.

    Scores of offshore oil rigs are located in the area off Tuxpan.

    Lorenzo was moving toward the west at about 11 kilometers (seven miles) per hour with maximum sustained winds of 100 kilometers (65 miles) per hour, with higher gusts.

    "Rapid weakening is forecast today as Lorenzo proceeds inland," the center said, while still warning that its heavy rain "could cause life-threatening flash floods and mudslides."

    The storm is expected to dump up to 25 centimeters (10 inches) of rain in the Mexican state of Veracruz, "with possible isolated maximums of 15 inches," or 38 centimeters.

    At least four Mexican states declared hurricane watches, the Mexican interior ministry said in a statement in Mexico City.

    Authorities evacuated people from low-lying and flood-prone areas in Veracruz, Tamaulipas, Tabasco and Campeche states, the statement added.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 7:36 PM  
    Karen may turn toward U.S. East Coast, depression forms

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Even as Tropical Storm Karen weakened over the central Atlantic on Friday, weather models showed the storm could turn westward toward Puerto Rico or the East Coast of North America over the next five days.

    Elsewhere in the Atlantic, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said Tropical Depression 14 formed about 210 miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands.

    Karen, meanwhile, was about 805 miles east-northeast of the Windward Islands of Dominica, Martinique, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent, the Grenadines and Grenada at about 11 a.m. EDT, the NHC said in a report.

    It was too soon to say where, if at all, either storm would make landfall.

    The energy market watches for tropical storms in the Gulf of Mexico because they can disrupt U.S. oil and natural gas production and refining there.

    None of the weather models currently show any storm in the Gulf of Mexico over the next five days.

    Commodities traders also track tropical storms because they can damage citrus crops in Florida and such crops as cotton along the Gulf Coast.

    The NHC will issue another advisory on Karen and TD-14 at 5 p.m.

    KAREN

    Karen, packing winds of 40 miles per hour, was moving west-northwest near 9 mph.

    The NHC predicted Karen would weaken into a tropical depression (winds under 39 mph) within 12 hours and remain a depression over the next five days.

    TD-14

    The depression was packing winds near 35 mph and could strengthen over the next 24 hours, the NHC said.

    The NHC predicted the depression would strengthen into a tropical storm (winds of 39-73 mph) over the next 12 hours before weakening back into a depression in three days and dissipating in about five days.

    The NHC will name the next tropical storm Melissa.

    The depression is moving west near 7 mph.

    Four out of five weather models show the depression will remain in the Atlantic Ocean over the next five days or so. Two models however show the storm turning back toward the east in a few days and one of those models show the storm reaching the northwest coast of Africa over the next several days.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 7:32 PM  
    Storms pose no risk to oil rigs in Gulf of Mexico
    Thursday, September 27, 2007

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Despite a tropical storm and a tropical depression spinning in the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico on Thursday, no storms currently threaten the U.S. oil and natural gas production in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    Tropical Depression 13, which could turn into a tropical storm, with winds of 39 to 73 miles per hour, later Thursday, however, could disrupt operations in some Mexican oil fields beneath the Bay of Campeche in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico.

    The U.S. National Hurricane Center said it expects the depression to strengthen into a tropical storm within 12 hours.

    The Center, however, does not expect TD-13 to strengthen into a hurricane, with winds over 74 mph, before moving inland in central Mexico and dissipating during the next 48 hours.

    The NHC will name the next tropical storm Lorenzo.

    TD-13, which is packing maximum sustained winds of nearly 35 mph, was located about 200 miles east-southeast of Tampico, Mexico, and about 140 miles east of Tuxpan, Mexico, at 8 a.m. EDT (1200 GMT), the NHC said in a report.

    The depression was moving west by southwest at nearly 3 mph with a slow move toward the west expected during the next 24 hours.

    The Center will issue another advisory on TD-13 at 11 a.m.

    TROPICAL STORM KAREN
    Tropical Storm Karen, meanwhile, weakened slightly over the open waters of the central Atlantic where it poses no threat to land.

    The NHC no longer expects Karen to gain hurricane strength in the next five days.

    In addition, it was still too soon for weather models to show whether Karen would ever reach land in North America.

    The center of Karen, which was packing winds of 65 mph, was located about 970 miles east of the Windward Islands of Dominica, Martinique, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent, the Grenadines and Grenada.

    It was moving west by northwest at nearly 15 mph, the NHC said.

    The Center will issue another advisory on Karen at 11 a.m.

    OTHER SYSTEMS

    A new area of low pressure off Florida's east-central coast could slowly develop over the next couple of days, the NHC projected.

    All of the weather models show the system will cross Florida and move into the Atlantic over the next few days. One model, however, shows the system will turn back toward the west, recross Florida, and enter the Gulf of Mexico over the next several days.

    Meanwhile, in the far eastern Atlantic just south of the Cape Verde Islands, a tropical wave became a little better organized Thursday morning and "some slow development is possible over the next couple of days as it moves westward at about 15 mph," the Center said.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 4:23 PM  
    Mexico's Gulf Coast braces for storm

    The Mexican government issued a tropical storm watch from Palma Sola to La Cruz, meaning winds of 39 mph to 73 mph were possible within the next 36 hours. The depression was expected to produce as much as 15 inches of rain over the Mexican state of Veracruz.

    At 5 a.m. EDT, the depression's center was about 205 miles east-southeast of Tampico and about 150 miles east of Tuxpan. Maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph.

    The storm, the 13th depression of the season, was moving toward the west-southwest at about 3 mph. It was to slowly move to the west during the next 24 hours.

    In the Atlantic, Karen's center was about 970 miles east of the Windward Islands and moving toward the west-northwest at about 15 mph. Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 205 miles.

    Maximum sustained winds decreased to 65 mph at 5 a.m. EDT, down from 70 mph three hours previously. Some further weakening was forecast.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 12:20 PM  
    Tropical Storm Karen nears hurricane strength
    Wednesday, September 26, 2007


    MIAMI (Reuters) - Tropical Storm Karen gained strength on Wednesday and could soon become a hurricane in the open Atlantic while a new tropical storm was expected to form in the Gulf of Mexico, U.S forecasters said.

    Karen, the 11th named Atlantic storm of the year, was located around 1,225 miles east of the Windward Islands by 11 a.m. (1500 GMT) and had top sustained winds of 70 miles per hour (110 km per hour), the U.S. National Hurricane Center said.

    The storm could become a hurricane later on Wednesday with winds in excess of 74 mph (119 kph), the hurricane center said, but its most likely track would take it well north of the Caribbean islands and out over open ocean, potentially toward Bermuda.

    A developing tropical system in the Gulf of Mexico, however, was expected to strike land within three days although computer models indicated that important U.S. and Mexican oil installations in the region were not at risk.

    The tropical depression, which would be named Lorenzo once it reaches tropical storm strength with winds of at least 39 mph (63 kph), was around 205 miles east-southeast of Tampico, Mexico, and around 155 miles east of Tuxpan.

    Its top winds were near 35 mph (55 kph) and it was expected to drift aimlessly for a while before coming ashore in central Mexico at below hurricane strength.

    None of the computer models used to forecast storm tracks and intensity showed the system heading north toward areas near Texas and Louisiana where the United States gets a third of domestic crude output and 15 percent of its natural gas.

    The 2007 Atlantic storm season has generated three hurricanes so far, including Hurricane Humberto, which startled coastal residents of Texas and Louisiana in mid-September by unexpectedly strengthening into a hurricane before landfall, and two ferocious maximum-strength Category 5 hurricanes.

    One of the Category 5 hurricanes, Dean, swiped Jamaica and then plowed into Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. The other, Felix, tore into Central America.

    It was the first time since records began in 1851 that two top-ranked hurricanes on the five-step Saffir-Simpson scale made landfall in the Atlantic basin in the same season, which begins June 1 and runs to the end of November.

    Weather experts have forecast an above-average 16 named storms this year. Record-busting 2005 saw 28 storms form, of which 15 strengthened into hurricanes, including Hurricane Katrina, the storm that swamped New Orleans.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 6:53 PM  
    Tropical depression forms in Gulf of Mexico
    MIAMI (Reuters) - A tropical depression formed on Tuesday in the southwest Gulf of Mexico, but it did not appear to pose a threat to U.S. and Mexican oil and natural gas installations.

    The weather system, which computer models indicated would not grow into a hurricane with winds above 74 miles per hour (119 km per hour), was located 190 miles east of Tampico in Mexico at around 6 p.m. EDT, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said.

    Most computer models used to forecast tropical storm tracks and intensities took the system into central Mexico after drifting aimlessly for a couple of days.

    The depression's top sustained winds had reached 30 mph (45 kph), the hurricane center said. If the system's top sustained winds reached tropical storm strength of at least 39 mph (63 kph), it would be named Lorenzo.

    That could happen on Wednesday, the Miami-based hurricane center said, adding a tropical storm watch could be required for parts of the Mexican Gulf Coast Tuesday evening. A watch means tropical storm conditions can be expected within 36 hours.

    Forecasters also were watching Tropical Storm Karen, which swirled in the Atlantic Ocean about 1,430 miles east of the Windward Islands of the Caribbean but was not expected to threaten land.

    The 11th named storm of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season, Karen was expected to turn to the north before reaching the Lesser Antilles.

    (Additional reporting by Michael Christie in Miami)
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 6:54 AM  
    Tropical Storm Karen swirls in open Atlantic
    Tuesday, September 25, 2007

    MIAMI (Reuters) - The 11th named tropical storm of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season swirled in the open ocean on Tuesday, and while it was forecast by some computer models to strengthen into a hurricane, it was not expected to threaten any land.

    Tropical Storm Karen was located around 1,515 miles (2,440 km) east of the Windward Islands of the Caribbean by 11 a.m. EDT (1500 GMT) after forming earlier in the morning, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said.

    Its top sustained winds had reached 40 miles per hour (65 km per hour) and it was moving west-northwest near 15 mph (24 kph). The storm was expected to turn to the north before reaching the Lesser Antilles.

    While two computer models used to forecast hurricane tracks and intensity indicated Karen could reach hurricane strength with top winds of at least 74 mph (119 kph), the hurricane center said the climatological conditions in the path of the storm did not appear to justify those forecasts.

    "The environment ahead of the storm is questionable for strengthening," it said in a discussion note, saying it expected Karen to remain at just below hurricane status and to then start weakening in the Atlantic after three days.

    The hurricane center was monitoring at least three other areas where weather disturbances had the potential to develop into tropical cyclones -- one in the Gulf of Mexico, where Mexico and the United States have important oil production facilities, another near the French island of Guadeloupe and the third over Florida and the Bahamas.

    The 2007 Atlantic storm season, which lasts through November 30, has generated three hurricanes so far, including two ferocious maximum-strength Category 5 hurricanes.

    One of them, Dean, swiped Jamaica and then plowed into Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. The other, Felix, tore into Central America.

    It was the first time since records began in 1851 that two top-ranked hurricanes on the five-step Saffir-Simpson scale made landfall in the Atlantic basin in the same year.

    Weather experts have forecast an above-average 16 named storms this year. Record-busting 2005 saw 28 storms form, of which 15 strengthened into hurricanes, including Hurricane Katrina, the storm that swamped New Orleans.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 8:33 PM  
    Tropical Storm Jerry weakens in open Atlantic
    Monday, September 24, 2007

    MIAMI (Reuters) - Tropical Storm Jerry weakened back into a depression on Monday as it headed for cooler waters in the open Atlantic, posing no threat to land, U.S. forecasters said.

    The 10th named storm of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season was located around 945 miles west-northwest of Portugal's Azores islands by 11 a.m. (1500 GMT) and was moving toward the northeast at 13 miles per hour (20 km per hour), the U.S. National Hurricane Center said.

    The depression had top sustained winds of around 35 mph (55 kph) and was expected to be absorbed by a larger nontropical weather system by Tuesday morning, the hurricane center said.

    The 2007 Atlantic storm season, which lasts officially until the end of November, has spawned three hurricanes so far, including two ferocious maximum-strength Category 5 hurricanes.

    One of them, Dean, swiped Jamaica and then plowed into Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. The other, Felix, tore into Central America.

    It was the first time since records began in 1851 that two top-ranked hurricanes on the five-step Saffir-Simpson scale made landfall in the same year.

    Weather experts have forecast an above-average 16 named storms this year. Record-busting 2005 saw 28 storms form, of which 15 strengthened into hurricanes. Tropical storms become hurricanes when their top winds reach 74 mph (119 kph).

    Apart from Jerry, the hurricane center said it was monitoring three areas that had the potential to become tropical cyclones -- one in the Gulf of Mexico, one near the Windward Islands of the Caribbean and the third 730 miles

    west-southwest of the Cape Verde islands.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 6:16 PM  
    Tropical storm little danger in Atlantic

    MIAMI - Tropical Storm Jerry picked up speed far out in the Atlantic Ocean early Monday, but forecasters said the storm's days are numbered and it poses no immediate threat to land.

    Jerry, which had formed Sunday, was accelerating toward tropical-storm killing cooler waters and wasn't expected to strengthen Monday, the National Hurricane Center said.

    Forecasters said Jerry was predicted to remain over open waters far from land and pass in between the Azores and southeastern Canada later Monday.

    At 5 a.m. EDT, Jerry was centered about 995 miles west of the Azores, with top sustained winds near 40 mph, just above the 38 mph cut off for a tropical depression. The storm was moving north-northeast around 15 mph.

    Jerry is the 10th named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season and its winds extended outward about 105 miles. It is forecast to be absorbed by a larger non-tropical low pressure system by Tuesday morning.

    In the Pacific, meanwhile, Ivo was downgraded from a tropical storm to a depression early Sunday, the Hurricane Center said.

    By Sunday afternoon, the center of Ivo was about 90 miles southwest of the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California peninsula and moving east near 5 mph.

    The depression — which had maximum sustained winds of 30 mph — is expected to pass over or near the southern tip of Baja near the resort cities of Cabo San Lucas and San Jose del Cabo, a region that was hit early this month by Hurricane Henriette. Rainfall of 1 to 2 inches is forecast for the area.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 12:30 PM  
    Ivo weakens to tropical storm near Mexico
    Saturday, September 22, 2007
    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Hurricane Ivo weakened to a tropical storm on Friday on its way to Mexico's Baja California peninsula, where it is due to make landfall in a sparsely populated desert area in the coming days.

    The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Ivo had maximum sustained winds of 70 mph (112 kph), making it less than hurricane strength.

    Ivo was more than 250 miles south of the beach and golf resort of Los Cabos and expected to hit further up the coast of the peninsula on Monday morning.

    Hurricane Henriette slammed into Los Cabos earlier this month, killing two fishermen and a foreign tourist.

    Henriette also flooded northern Mexico with driving rain, raging over the farming states of Sonora and Sinaloa.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 1:14 PM  
    Gulf Coast under tropical storm warning
    Friday, September 21, 2007
    (CNN) -- The National Hurricane Center issued a tropical storm warning Friday for a long stretch of the Gulf Coast.
    The warning area reaches from Apalachicola, Florida, to the mouth of the Mississippi River, including New Orleans, Louisiana.

    The warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected within 24 hours.

    The warning was prompted by the development of a subtropical depression in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Maximum sustained winds from the depression were clocked at 35 mph (55 kph), and forecasters expected the system to strengthen by Saturday.

    Around 11 a.m. ET, the depression's poorly defined center was about 45 miles (75 kilometers) southwest of Apalachicola and 185 miles (300 kilometers) southeast of Mobile, Alabama. It was moving northwest at 8 mph (13 kph), the hurricane center said.

    The system could generate tornadoes in southwestern Georgia, the Florida Panhandle and southeastern Alabama through Friday night, the center said.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 6:41 PM  
    Ivo strengthens into hurricane near Mexico
    Thursday, September 20, 2007


    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Tropical Storm Ivo strengthened into a hurricane on Wednesday as it headed over the Pacific toward Mexico's Baja California peninsula, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said.

    Ivo had maximum sustained winds of 75 mph (120 kph) and was some 500 miles south of the peninsula's beach and golf resort Los Cabos, popular with U.S. visitors.

    The latest forecasters' models showed the storm was due to curve into Baja California early next week, the center said.

    Hurricane Henriette slammed into Los Cabos earlier this month, killing a foreign tourist. Two fishermen also died.

    Henriette flooded northern Mexico with driving rain, raging over the farming states of Sonora and Sinaloa.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 12:25 PM  
    Weakened typhoon Wipha drenches eastern China
    Wednesday, September 19, 2007

    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - Typhoon Wipha lost strength after crossing the eastern coast of China on Wednesday but downpours have still taken a heavy toll in two provinces.

    The storm toppled thousands of homes and knocked out power and water supplies as it swept ashore, state media said.

    Five people were killed, mostly by landslides, and three more were missing, Xinhau news agency said.

    About 2.7 million people were evacuated in eastern China, including the financial hub Shanghai ahead of its landfall early Wednesday morning.

    Torrential rains drenched Zhejiang and parts of the neighboring provinces of Fujian, Anhui and Jiangsu, submerging crops, houses and streets.

    Wipha grazed northern Taiwan and triggered floodwaters in Japan's southern islands, sweeping away at least two people and forcing thousands to flee.

    In Zhejiang, Wipha cut off power in nearly 1,900 villages, destroyed almost 2,500 houses, flooded 160,000 hectares of farmland and severed 239 roads, affecting 6 million people, Xinhua said.

    The storm caused estimated economic losses of 6.6 billion yuan ($878.2 million) in Zhejiang and Fujian, as rivers and reservoirs overflowed. Thousands of dyke breaches were reported, Xinhua said.

    Dozens of flights to and from the Wenzhou airport were cancelled on Tuesday and Wednesday.
    But Wipha, a female name in Thai, weakened into a tropical storm after hitting land. It mostly missed Shanghai as it headed north toward Jiangsu province.

    One man was electrocuted in Shanghai ahead of the storm on Tuesday, local media said. Schools were closed on Wednesday in Shanghai and most of Zhejiang.

    Wipha landed just where Super Typhoon Saomai, the strongest China had seen in 50 years, hit last year, killing hundreds in Fujian and Zhejiang provinces.

    The densely populated area is home to many small businesses and factories, with a mixture of modern buildings and older brick homes. Some 50,000 Zhejiang factories on the path of Wipha were forced to halt production, Xinhua said.

    "The wind was not as strong as Saomai, but it lasted longer," an official from Xiaguan township, where Wipha made landfall, told Reuters by telephone.

    Typhoons regularly hit China, Taiwan, the Philippines and Japan in the summer months, gathering strength from warm sea waters before weakening over land.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 10:46 PM  
    1.8 million evacuated as typhoon pounds China
    Tuesday, September 18, 2007

    SHANGHAI, China (AP) -- A typhoon expected to be the most powerful storm to hit China in a decade churned toward the densely populated coast on Tuesday with 165 mph wind gusts, and the government evacuated 1.8 million people.

    The fringes of Typhoon Wipha lashed northern Taiwan, where schools, offices and the stock market closed. A construction worker was killed when the storm's winds knocked down scaffolding, Taiwan's Disaster Relief Center said.

    City authorities ordered schools closed Wednesday in Shanghai, a city of more than 20 million and China's financial hub. Chinese state-run television showed families being evacuated from their fishing boats and other vessels. Shopkeepers stacked sand bags to prevent flooding as drains clogged amid torrential rains.

    The typhoon, whipping up waves up to 36 feet high, was moving northwest toward the Chinese mainland.

    By midnight local time, the typhoon appeared to be weakening and looked likely to hit land early Wednesday further south of Shanghai than originally forecast, the official Xinhua News Agency reported, citing local meteorologists.

    Wipha, a woman's name in Thai, was upgraded from a tropical storm Monday. Watch CNN's international weather forecast »

    "The typhoon is very likely to develop into the worst one in recent years," said a man who answered the phone at the city's meteorological bureau. As is common with Chinese officials, the man identified himself only by his surname, Fu.
    Shanghai and the coastal provinces of Zhejiang and Fujian to the south issued typhoon warnings requiring all vessels to return to shore or change course to avoid the storm, the official Xinhua News Agency said.

    It said that 1.8 million people living in coastal or low-lying areas of Shanghai, Zhejiang and Fujian had been evacuated.(CNN)


    It said nearly 30,000 fishing boats in the province had taken shelter in port by late Monday and ferry service with outlying islands was suspended.

    The deadliest storm to hit the China coast in recent years was Typhoon Winnie in 1997, which killed 236 people. Typhoon Rananim, with winds of more than 100 mph, was the strongest typhoon to hit the Chinese mainland since 1956, killing nearly 200 people.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 9:57 PM  
    Tropical activity possible in Gulf of Mexico

    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Tropical activity is possible in a couple of days in the Gulf of Mexico, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said in a report Tuesday.

    At 5:30 a.m. EDT (0930 GMT), the NHC said, "Conditions are currently unfavorable for development of a large area of disorganized cloudiness and thunderstorm associated with a tropical wave and an upper-level trough (an elongated area of low pressure) from the east coast of Florida eastward for a few hundred miles over the western Atlantic and Bahamas."

    However, the NHC added, "Slow development is possible in a couple of days when the system moves westward over Florida and into the eastern Gulf of Mexico."

    The energy market watches for tropical storms because they can disrupt U.S. oil and natural gas production and refining if the storms enter the Gulf of Mexico.

    Commodities traders also track tropical storms because they can damage citrus crops in Florida and such crops as cotton along the Gulf Coast.

    The NHC will name the next tropical storm Jerry. A tropical storm typically packs winds of 39 to 73 miles per hour.

    In the Atlantic Ocean, meanwhile, the NHC said any development of a tropical wave located about 800 miles east of the Lesser Antilles islands in the eastern Caribbean would be slow to occur as it continues westward at 10 to 15 mph.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 4:34 PM  
    Powerful typhoon heads for China's financial hub


    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - A powerful typhoon targeted China's booming eastern province of Zhejiang and financial hub Shanghai on Tuesday, prompting the evacuation of tens of thousands of people as ships and boats were called back to port.

    Typhoon Wipha was 440 km (270 miles) southeast of the former foreign treaty port of Wenzhou in Zhejiang at 0300 GMT. With gusts of up to 198 km per hour, it was moving northwest at 20 km per hour, Xinhua news agency said, putting it on a course to skirt Taiwan.

    "East China, including the commercial hub of Shanghai, is preparing for what may be the most destructive typhoon in a decade," the agency said.

    It did not mention Typhoon Saomai, which killed 436 people in southeast China in August and was labeled the strongest storm to hit China in 50 years.

    The Hong Kong Observatory chart showed Wipha heading directly for Zhejiang where it was likely to make landfall early on Wednesday and sweep north across the province towards Shanghai.

    China's National Meteorological Centre described the storm on its Web site (www.nmc.gov.cn) as a "super typhoon".

    About 200,000 people living in exposed areas in Shanghai, bordering Zhejiang in the north and with a population of over 14 million, would be moved to temporary shelter before evening.

    Tens of thousands of boats and ships had returned to harbor in Zhejiang, where beach resorts and sea farms were evacuated and ferry services suspended, state media said.

    "Wipha will hit our province head on and the areas affected would be the most economically developed and densely populated," the Zhejiang provincial government warned.
    "Strong winds will come with heavy rainfall ... The relief work will be complicated and grave," it said in a statement on its Web site (www.zj.gov.cn).

    Zhejiang's inland areas also faced the threats of floods and landslides caused by torrential rain, it said.

    The edge of Wipha grazed northern Taiwan on Tuesday, bringing downpours and prompting the area to close schools, offices and markets.

    The major northern port of Keelung stopped all traffic on Tuesday until further notice, while five airlines cancelled some international flights.

    Typhoons, large cyclones known as hurricanes in the West, regularly hit China, Taiwan, the Philippines and Japan in the summer season, gathering strength from the warm waters of the Pacific or the South China Sea before weakening over land.

    Sometimes they make a u-turn, gather strength at sea again, and return to wreak more havoc.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 1:02 PM  
    Ingrid fades to depression
    Saturday, September 15, 2007
    (CNN) -- Tropical Storm Ingrid faded to a tropical depression Saturday, done in by "hostile winds aloft," according to the National Hurricane Center.

    As of 11 a.m. ET, Ingrid's maximum sustained winds had diminished to 35 mph (55 kph). The system's center was about 510 miles (820 kilometers) east of the Lesser Antilles, headed northwest at about 10 mph (16 kph), according to the hurricane center.

    Forecasters said it should continue to weaken during the next 24 hours because of a strong westerly flow above it.

    "Ingrid is becoming a just large swirl of low clouds with a few patches of intermittent convection," NHC senior hurricane specialist Lixion Avila said in an online discussion.

    Computer models showed the system turning more northward and staying out in the Atlantic. See Ingrid's path »

    Meanwhile, utility workers were restoring power to areas affected by Hurricane Humberto, whose remnants rolled to the East Coast overnight.

    Damage from the storm, which came ashore early Thursday morning near the Texas-Louisiana line, was estimated Friday at less than $500 million, The Associated Press reported.

    Joe Domino, Entergy Texas president and CEO, said some customers' power might not be restored until Tuesday, AP reported.

    Power was restored to two of three major crude oil and liquid hydrocarbon plants in Port Arthur, Texas, company spokespeople told AP.

    Humberto aftermath
    I-Reporters document what Humberto left behind

    At High Island, Texas, where Humberto made landfall, the local water utility was depending on generators to keep operating, according to AP.

    "I think we can do better without lights than we can without water," resident George Leger told the news service. See some of Humberto's damage from the air »

    The remnants of the hurricane brought an inch or more of rain to areas of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee Friday afternoon.

    A cold front merged with Humberto's remnants, causing strong thunderstorms in North Carolina, where a tree fell on a nursing home near Raleigh, AP reported.


    "It's just terrible," Mildred Wheeler, whose husband lives in the home, told AP. "Water's flooding the building, and you have people here on oxygen machines."

    Asheville, North Carolina, received 3.4 inches (8.6 centimeters) of rain, and Charleston, South Carolina received 2.5 inches (6.4 centimeters),according to National Weather Service data.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 6:10 PM  
    Floods kill 15 in Rwanda, leave 1,000 homeless
    Friday, September 14, 2007

    KIGALI (Reuters) - Floods killed 15 people and left about 1,000 people homeless after torrential downpours in the hills of northern Rwanda, the government said on Friday.

    "The death toll has reached 15 since the heavy rains started on Wednesday," said Local Government Minister Protais Musoni.

    He told Reuters the Northern Province had also suffered hailstorms and landslides, sweeping away livestock and property and complicating relief efforts. More people were expected to be uprooted as the rain continued to fall.

    "We are undertaking some emergency measures, taking those displaced to drier areas and providing them with medical care and food," Musoni said.

    Heavy rains killed 25 people in same region last November.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 11:58 AM  
    Tropical Storm Ingrid forms over Atlantic


    MIAMI (AFP) - Tropical Storm Ingrid emerged over the Atlantic Ocean on Thursday, becoming the ninth named storm of the 2007 Atlantic season, the US National Hurricane Center said.

    With winds of up to 65 kilometers (40 miles) per hour, Ingrid was about 1,350 kilometers (840 miles) east of the Lesser Antilles, a chain of popular tourist islands, the center said.

    Ingrid was moving west-northwest at about nine kilometers (six miles) per hour. "A small increase in strength is possible during the next 24 hours," the center said in a bulletin at 11 pm Thursday (0300 GMT Friday).

    Several hours earlier, the third hurricane of the Atlantic season, Humberto, formed over the Gulf of Mexico before striking the southeast Texas coast with category one force, the lowest strength in the five-level Saffir-Simpson scale. At least one person died.

    The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 11:43 AM  
    Tropical Depression EIGHT Public Advisory
    Thursday, September 13, 2007

    000
    WTNT33 KNHC 132033
    TCPAT3
    BULLETIN
    TROPICAL DEPRESSION EIGHT ADVISORY NUMBER 6
    NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL082007
    500 PM AST THU SEP 13 2007

    ...POORLY ORGANIZED DEPRESSION SLOWLY MOVING WEST-NORTHWESTWARD...

    AT 500 PM AST...2100Z...THE CENTER OF TROPICAL DEPRESSION EIGHT WAS
    LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 14.2 NORTH...LONGITUDE 48.4 WEST OR ABOUT 865
    MILES...1395 KM...EAST OF THE LESSER ANTILLES.

    THE DEPRESSION IS MOVING TOWARD THE WEST-NORTHWEST NEAR 6 MPH...10
    KM/HR. THIS GENERAL MOTION IS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE DURING THE NEXT
    24 HOURS.

    MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 35 MPH...55 KM/HR...WITH HIGHER
    GUSTS. ALTHOUGH UPPER-LEVEL CONDITIONS HAVE BECOME LESS FAVORABLE
    FOR STRENGTHENING...THE DEPRESSION STILL HAS THE CHANCE TO BECOME A
    TROPICAL STORM DURING THE NEXT 12 TO 24 HOURS. A NOAA HURRICANE
    HUNTER PLANE IS SCHEDULED TO INVESTIGATE THE SYSTEM THIS EVENING.

    ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 1006 MB...29.71 INCHES.

    REPEATING THE 500 PM AST POSITION...14.2 N...48.4 W. MOVEMENT
    TOWARD...WEST-NORTHWEST NEAR 6 MPH. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...35
    MPH. MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1006 MB.

    THE NEXT ADVISORY WILL BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER AT
    1100 PM AST.
    (NOAA)
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 10:36 PM  
    Indonesia Under New Tsunami Alert
    (PADANG, Indonesia) — Indonesia was shaken Thursday by the third powerful earthquake in less than 24 hours, and survivors described watching in horror as the ocean retreated and raced back to shore as a 10-foot-high tsunami.

    Hundreds of houses were destroyed and panicked residents fled to the hills. At least 10 people were killed in the quakes, which were followed by dozens of aftershocks.

    The 8.4-magnitude quake that first shook Southeast Asia on Wednesday was the strongest this year. But the huge mass of water it spawned was pushed to sea rather than land, said Mike Turnbull, a seismologist at Australia's Central Queensland University. "It's a quirk of nature that this is how it happened," he said. "It could have quite easily have been the other way."

    The 10-foot wave slammed into at least one village on Sumatra, the island ravaged by the 2004 tsunami that killed more than 230,000 people in a dozen nations.

    Rukhlan, a 43-year-old fisherman, said residents of the village, Muara Maras, were horrified when they saw the ocean retreat and then race back to shore. "I heard people screaming and yelling tsunami! tsunami!" he said. "I ran to find my children, but they had already run to the hills." A dozen houses were swept out to sea. Smaller waves were recorded further down the coast.

    Two other powerful temblors — magnitudes 7.8 and 6.2 — followed on Thursday in western and eastern Indonesia, the U.S. Geological Survey said. They were accompanied by many powerful aftershocks. Several tsunami warnings were issued and later lifted.

    The worst destruction was caused by the jolts along the coast, especially in the city of Padang, 115 miles from the epicenter below the seabed off the western coast of Sumatra. "At least five large buildings — including mosques, houses and a school — collapsed," said Surya Budhi, who was overseeing emergency response in the area.

    A fire also broke out on the fourth floor of a shopping mall.

    Yulinar, a fisherman's wife who lives with her husband and five children in a wooden shack at a waterfront market in Padang, said the second, magnitude-7.8 quake, just six miles deep, was so powerful they had to grab onto the furniture to keep from falling down when it struck at 6:49 a.m. "I was so scared the tsunami was coming," said Yulinar, who fled inland with her family after a tsunami warning from the mayor was broadcast through mosque speakers.

    The third quake struck at 4:48 p.m. off Sulawesi island along a different fault line at a depth of13 miles, the USGS said. More than 30 aftershocks have rattled the region in the last day and many people refused to return to their homes, fearing a repeat of the 2004 tsunami. Nearly two-thirds of the deaths in that disaster were in nearby Aceh province.

    Australia's Bureau of Meteorology warned that unusual waves could hit Christmas Island, but locals said there was no sign of a tsunami about an hour after the predicted time. "The danger has passed," said Linda Cash, a manager at the Christmas Island Visitors Center, adding that police were telling people to stay away from beaches.

    Telephone lines and electricity were disrupted across a large swath of Indonesia, making it difficult to get information about damage and casualties.

    Death tolls released by several agencies ranged from five to 10. Rustam Pakaya, the chief of Health Crisis Center, gave the latter figure, which was based on information gathered from local hospitals, clinics and regional health offices. He said at least 49 people were injured.

    Sensitive to criticism about slow responses to the 2004 tsunami disaster, governments issued alerts as far away as Kenya and Tanzania in East Africa, telling people to leave beaches. People in Mombasa, Kenya, crowded into buses after hearing the warning over the radio. Thailand's National Disaster Warning Center sent cell phone text messages alerting hundreds of officials in six southern provinces, and authorities also were told to prepare in India's remote Andaman and Nicobar islands. Sri Lankans were told to move more than 650 feet inland.

    Indonesia, the world's largest archipelago, with a population of 235 million people, is prone to seismic upheaval due to its location on the "Ring of Fire," an arc of volcanos and fault lines encircling the Pacific Basin.(Time)
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 8:49 PM  
    Hurricane Humberto slams into Texas


    HOUSTON (Reuters) - Hurricane Humberto rumbled onto the upper Texas coast on Thursday with 85 mile per hour (135 kph) winds and heavy rains that threatened widespread flooding.

    The storm, which brewed up in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday, made landfall near High Island, about 30 miles northeast of Galveston, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said in a report at 3:10 a.m. EDT (0710 GMT).

    Humberto had been expected to come ashore as a tropical storm, but suddenly strengthened in the gulf's warm waters.

    It struck a lightly populated area, and there were no reports of damage or injuries. The storm was expected to plow through southeastern Texas and head east into Louisiana, where officials braced for flooding.

    Humberto was a minimal, Category 1 storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale, but forecasters said it could dump up to 15 inches of rain because it was dawdling along at just 8 mph (13 kph).

    Galveston reported 5 inches of rain as Humberto eased past on Wednesday, headed toward the Texas-Louisiana border.

    A hurricane warning was in place from High Island to Cameron, Louisiana, which was still recovering Hurricane Rita in 2005. Rita struck the Texas-Louisiana border region three weeks after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans.

    Humberto was the third hurricane of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season, and was dwarfed by its ferocious Category 5 predecessors Dean and Felix.

    They struck Mexico and Central America, respectively, with Felix leaving at least 130 dead.
    Texas and Louisiana officials positioned emergency teams and rescue equipment in the path of Humberto.

    Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco declared a state of emergency while Texas Gov. Rick Perry vowed to "work with local officials to provide the state resources necessary to ensure the safety of all Texas residents."

    The Texas-Louisiana border area is a major oil-producing and gasoline-refining area, but industry officials predicted little impact to operations.

    The hurricane center said at 11 p.m. EDT (0300 GMT) another storm, Tropical Depression 8, was located 1,005 miles (1,620 km) east of the Lesser Antilles islands of the eastern Caribbean Sea and moving west-northwest at 12 mph (19 kph).

    It had not yet strengthened as expected, but was likely to become a tropical storm on Thursday, forecasters said.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 11:33 AM  
    Tropical storm Humberto forms in Gulf of Mexico
    Wednesday, September 12, 2007

    MIAMI, Florida (AP) -- Tropical Storm Humberto formed in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday, and officials issued a warning for parts of the Texas and Louisiana coasts where heavy rain could cause flooding.

    Rain was already falling along the Gulf Coast at 1 p.m. CT, with Humberto's center still about 70 miles south-southwest of Galveston, Texas, the National Hurricane Center said.

    The center of the storm was expected to reach the Texas coast Wednesday night.

    The eighth named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season had maximum sustained winds of 45 mph.

    A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when its top sustained winds reach 74 mph. See Humberto's projected path »

    A tropical storm warning was in effect from Port O'Connor, Texas, to Cameron, Louisiana, the National Hurricane Center said in its 1 p.m. CT advisory.
    About 5 to 10 inches of rain were expected along the middle and upper Texas coast and in southwestern Louisiana, with some areas possibly getting as much as 15 inches, according to the center.

    The NHC predicted coastal storm surge flooding of 2 to 3 feet above normal tide levels wherever Humberto makes landfall.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 8:19 PM  
    Storm warnings issued for Texas, La.


    At 11 a.m. EDT, the ninth tropical depression of the Atlantic hurricane season had maximum sustained winds of 35 mph and its center was about 85 miles south-southwest of Galveston, Texas, the National Hurricane Center said.

    Senior hurricane specialist Jack Beven said about 5 to 10 inches of rain were expected along the middle and upper Texas coast and in southwestern Louisiana, with some areas possibly getting as much as 15 inches.

    This has been a wet summer for Texas, so the extra rain could be "enough to create some considerable flooding," he said.

    The depression was moving toward the north near 6 mph and was expected to cross the Texas coast later Wednesday within the warning area between Port O'Connor, Texas, and Cameron, La. A tropical storm watch was issued for Louisiana from Cameron to Intracoastal City.

    Forecasters expect the depression to become a weak tropical storm with sustained winds of about 45 mph by the time it makes landfall.

    A depression becomes a named tropical storm when its sustained winds reach 39 mph.

    The next name on the National Hurricane Center's list for 2007 is Humberto.

    Another tropical depression also formed Wednesday in the open Atlantic. It was centered about 1,130 miles east of the Lesser Antilles, had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph and was moving west-northwest at about 12 mph.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 6:17 PM  
    Micro-dust could tame hurricanes: study

    TRIESTE, Italy (AFP) - Seeding a hurricane with microscopic dust could sharply reduce its force, according to a study which calculated that the technique might have spared New Orleans from the devastating power of Katrina in 2005.

    The findings were presented this week at the European Conference on Severe Storms in the Italian port city of Trieste.

    In computer simulations, scientists showed that sowing tiny moisture-seeking particles into the lower reaches of a hurricane would prevent the formation of rain and reduce temperatures, starving the storm of its source of energy.

    The process "creates clouds with a large number of small drops that fall very slowly, floating with air molecules, and are less likely to collide with each other and coalesce into rain drops," explained Daniel Rosenfeld, a scientist at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem who developed the concept with several colleagues.

    Hurricanes are powerful, swirling storms up to 800 kilometres (500 miles) across that begin over tropical seas with a surface temperature greater than 26.5 C (80 F). The warm seawater evaporates and is absorbed by the surrounding air.

    Rosenfeld first tested his model in a "control run" to see whether the simulation would match Katrina as it really happened, which it did.

    When he factored in the effect of cloud seeding -- taking into account the impact of sea spray, which would reduce the desired effect -- the radius of hurricane-force winds shrunk by at least 25 percent, with wind speeds reduced throughout the hurricane.

    Hurricane-force winds begin at 119 kilometres per hour and can reach speeds of more than 300 kilometres per hour.

    "That would affect mainly the sea surge, which means less rising of the water, which might have made the difference in New Orleans," Rosenfeld told AFP.

    The simulated path of the weakened storm curved north as compared to Katrina, and would have made landfall about 200 kilometres east of the city.

    It would take five to 10 Lockheed C-130s cargo planes to disperse some 200 tonnes per hour of particles so small -- less than one millionth of a metre across -- that they would be emitted in the form of smoke.

    The planes would be hundreds of kilometres from the eye of the hurricane, and thus out of harm's way.

    Trying to extend the practice of cloud seeding -- commonly used both to make or impede precipitation -- to hurricanes is not new.

    In a project called "Stormfury", the US government ran a series of experiments from 1962 to 1983 that attempted to decrease hurricane force by artificially stimulating convection -- the vertical transfer of heat and moisture -- outside the wall which encases the eye of the storm.

    The idea was to expand the size of the eye, typically 15 to 65 kilometres (10 to 40 miles) in diameter, and thus slow the destructive winds that swirl around the eyewall. (Inside the eye, there are no winds or clouds.)

    Tests were done on four hurricanes before the technique was abandoned.

    Rosenfeld was inspired to try again after observing that a "heavy load of small aerosols" -- in other words, smoke from forest fires -- can prevent warm rain from tropical clouds.

    "I tried to fix some of the problems that prevented Stormfury from working," he said.

    One of the co-authors of the new study, William Woodley, flew into hurricanes during the 1970s as part of the earlier effort.

    Putting his hurricane-taming concept into practice, he cautions, will take years of additional research and experimentation.

    But the fact that another research team in the United States, working independently, came up with the same idea at about the same time suggests that it may just hold water.

    Hurricanes can uproot trees and tear the roofs off houses, but the most dangerous effect is a rapid rise in sea level called a storm surge, which is what caused the levees protecting New Orleans to give way.

    A cyclone in 1970 produced a surge that killed more than 250,000 people in the low-lying regions of what is today the Bangladesh.

    Hurricanes last an average of three to 14 days, and can meander as far as 6,000 kilometres at speeds of 15 to 30 kilometres per hour.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 3:20 PM  
    Powerful quake strikes Indonesia
    JAKARTA, Indonesia (CNN) -- Indonesia's meteorological center lifted the tsunami watch issued after a 7.9-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of southern Sumatra.

    It said there was no concern about the small tsunami, reported by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center. The two-foot tsunami registered in Padang, north of the quake's epicenter.

    Meanwhile, India's government has issued its own tsunami alert for the coastal states of Kerela, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, and the island territories of Andaman and Nicobar.

    Those regions in India were hit by the devastating tsunami that struck in 2004, triggered by a massive quake off the coast of Indonesia which killed more than 200,000 people across Asia.

    A tsunami watch was also issued for all Indian Ocean areas including Australia, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Pakistan, Iran, Yemen and Kenya.

    The earthquake struck at 1810 local time (1110 GMT) in Bengkulu province.

    Several skyscrapers in Jakarta were rocked by the quake, which came at the end of the work day, said Andy Saputra, CNN producer in Jakarta.

    "It's pretty strong and people are being evacuated from the tall buildings," he said.

    Jakarta is 605 km (375 miles) southeast of the epicenter, believed to be Bengkulu Province in southern Sumatra.

    Although some employees were too afraid to leave their offices, companies ordered immediate emergency evacuations, Saputra said.

    Workers exited structures via fire stairs and went into the street, away from buildings and other potential dangers, he added.

    The Financial Times' John Aglionby, speaking from Jakarta, told CNN: "I was up on the 16th floor of a skyscraper... I heard the blinds flapping and the windows first and the chairs were shaking and everything, and realized that we had to get out."

    A resident of Bengkulu province told CNN: "Everyone is running out their houses in every direction."
    High-rise buildings also were evacuated in Singapore, CNN Producer Martin Bohley said.

    He said he felt shaking for almost a minute.

    "At first I wasn't quite sure, then I reconfirmed with staff at the hotel, then I turned on local media here, and local media had reported that several high-rise locations had felt it so strong that they had evacuated."

    Ken Navidad at the U.S. Geological Survey said in Denver said the tsunami centers in the Pacific and Alaska initially said two quakes, but he did not know why. He said his agency has measured only one.

    Wednesday's earthquake is 10 times smaller than the one that caused the giant tsunami off the northern tip of Indonesia in 2004, John Applegate of the USGS in Washington said.

    But he added: "The earthquake itself is a warning that there could be a tsunami, and people have to get off the beaches."

    Applegate said it was a shallow earthquake, about 19 miles deep, which is more of a threat to the local population.

    "(With a) deep earthquake, the waves have to travel through a lot of the earth before they reach population; shallow earthquake means the local population is right there," he explained.

    "It also means that its more likely to rupture the surface, and with this being a subsea earthquake, that means there is the tsunami potential."

    Tsunami warning centers in Hawaii and Alaska said no tsunamis were expected in their areas.

    Indonesia, which sits on the Pacific Basin's "Ring of Fire" - an arc of volcanos and fault lines, is prone to seismic upheaval.

    In December 2004, a massive earthquake off Sumatra island triggered a tsunami that killed more than 230,000 people, including 160,000 people in Indonesia's province of Aceh.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 3:15 PM  
    Atlantic SPECIAL TROPICAL DISTURBANCE STATEMENT
    000
    WONT41 KNHC 121239
    DSAAT
    SPECIAL TROPICAL DISTURBANCE STATEMENT
    NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
    845 AM EDT WED SEP 12 2007

    SATELLITE AND NWS RADAR OBSERVATIONS INDICATE THAT THE AREA OF LOW
    PRESSURE IN THE NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO IS BECOMING BETTER
    ORGANIZED THIS MORNING. THIS SYSTEM COULD BECOME A TROPICAL
    DEPRESSION LATER TODAY...AND AN AIR FORCE RESERVE UNIT
    RECONNAISSANCE AIRCRAFT WILL INVESTIGATE THE AREA EARLY THIS
    AFTERNOON. THE LOW IS MOVING SLOWLY NORTH-NORTHWESTWARD...AND
    REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT IT BECOMES A TROPICAL CYCLONE...HEAVY
    RAINS ARE EXPECTED TO SPREAD ACROSS SOUTHEASTERN TEXAS AND
    LOUISIANA OVER THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS. FOR INFORMATION SPECIFIC
    TO YOUR AREA...PLEASE CONSULT STATEMENTS ISSUED BY YOUR LOCAL NWS
    FORECAST OFFICE. (NOAA)
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 3:14 PM  
    Depression may form in Atlantic or Gulf of Mexico
    Tuesday, September 11, 2007
    NEW YORK (Reuters) - A tropical depression could form in the Atlantic Ocean or in the western Gulf of Mexico over the next couple of days, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said on Tuesday.

    In an outlook at 5:30 a.m. EDT (0930 GMT), the NHC said showers and thunderstorm associated with a tropical wave and a broad area of low pressure located about 1,250 miles east of the Windward Islands (Dominica, Martinique, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent, The Grenadines and Grenada) did not become better organized this morning.

    The NHC, however, said, "Upper level winds are expected to become more favorable for development and this system could become a tropical depression within a day or two" as it moves westward to west northwestward at 10 to 15 miles per hour.

    Over the next five days or so, the weather models show the Atlantic system will approach the islands in the eastern Caribbean.

    In the western Gulf of Mexico, the NHC said showers and thunderstorms associated with an area of low pressure remain disorganized.

    However, the NHC said, "Upper level winds could become a little more favorable for development of this system prior to it reaching the coast of Texas and northeastern Mexico tonight or early Wednesday."

    If either system strengthens into a tropical storm (winds of 39-73 mph), the NHC will name it Humberto.

    The energy market watches for tropical storms because they can disrupt U.S. oil and natural gas production and refining if the storms enter the Gulf of Mexico.

    Commodities traders also track tropical storms because they can damage citrus crops in Florida and such crops as cotton along the Gulf Coast.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 4:09 PM  
    Help find Steve Fosset by Sat. google earth
    Monday, September 10, 2007

    Or USE THIS KML FILE
    To view in Google Earth, load the KML file below then cut and paste:
    38.602524,-119.298477

    in the "Fly To" box found at the top left corner of the application.
    For a similar viewing experience in Google Earth to the above image, navigate to an altitude of roughly 1,500 feet.
    IMPORTANT: Please ensure that you've loaded the following KML file below in Google Earth before navigating to the co-ordinates. Otherwise, you risk looking at old and irrelevant images.
    KML file for Google Earth Searching:http://s3.amazonaws.com/fossett/geoeye-color.kml
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 10:54 PM  
    Tropical depression could form in Atlantic
    NEW YORK (Reuters) - A tropical depression could form in the Atlantic Ocean over the next couple of days, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said on Monday.
    In an outlook at 5:30 a.m. EDT (0930 GMT), the NHC said a broad area of low pressure associated with a tropical wave was located about 900 miles west-southwest of the Cape Verde Islands.

    Three out of five weather models show the system nearing the islands in the eastern Caribbean in about five days.

    It was moving westward to west-northwestward at 10 to 15 miles per hour.

    The NHC said the system was "gradually becoming better organized and has the potential to develop into a tropical depression."

    If the system strengthens into a tropical storm (winds of 39-73 mph) the NHC will name it Humberto.

    The energy market watches for tropical storms because they can disrupt U.S. oil and natural gas production and refining if the storms enter the Gulf of Mexico.

    Commodities traders also track tropical storms because they can damage citrus crops in Florida and such crops as cotton along the Gulf Coast.

    Separately, the NHC noted there was a tropical wave over the Windward and Leeward Islands in the eastern Caribbean and a weak surface trough (an elongated area of low-pressure) extending from South Florida to the Bay of Campeche in the southwest Gulf of Mexico. The Center does not expect either system to organize into a tropical cyclone at this time.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 4:43 PM  
    Gabrielle returns to Atlantic
    NAGS HEAD, N.C. - Gabrielle, struggling to stay organized as it pulled away from the North Carolina coast, weakened from a tropical storm to a tropical depression early Monday, the National Hurricane Center said.

    The storm lost many of its rainmaking clouds over land, and its maximum sustained winds weakened to 35 mph over cooler water as it moved farther out over the Atlantic Ocean.

    At 5 a.m. EDT, Gabrielle's center was located about 140 miles north-northeast of Cape Hatteras.

    The storm's small center made landfall along the Cape Lookout National Seashore as a Tropical Storm at around 11:45 a.m. Sunday, then passed back into the Atlantic near Kill Devil Hills less than 12 hours later, increasing spead to 12 mph from 10 mph.

    Other than some inconvenient winds, light road flooding and a bit of welcome rain, Gabrielle left tourists and surfers largely unimpressed.

    "If you think of what might have been as it approached us, I would say that we're in very good shape," said Dorothy Toolan, a spokeswoman for Dare County Emergency Management.

    Although some isolated spots had significant rainfall — including more than 8 inches in Beaufort — precipitation only reached a handful of eastern North Carolina counties.

    The entire state is gripped by drought, particularly in western and central counties, and there was hope the first storm of the Atlantic hurricane season to reach North Carolina would provide some relief.

    "We're glad we didn't have any flooding or wind damage, but the rain would have been nice," said Julia Jarema, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Crime Control and Public Safety. "The coast got some rain, but they were the ones with the least problems from the drought."

    The National Weather Service said 1.5 feet of water from Pamlico Sound covered parts of Highway 12 near Salvo, a common spot for overwash, but that the roadway was still passable and the surge would subside overnight.

    Ferry service to Ocracoke Island that was suspended Sunday afternoon was to resume Monday morning, Jarema said.

    Gabrielle developed into a subtropical storm Friday before spinning into a full tropical system Saturday. The system had spent several days stalled in the Atlantic along an old frontal boundary.

    "This has given us a little practice run for hurricanes," said Currituck County spokeswoman Diane Sawyer. "You don't wish to have a storm, but if you have to have one it's a good one to have."(AP)
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 11:19 AM  
    Subtropical Storm GABRIELLE Public Advisory 3
    Saturday, September 8, 2007
    000
    WTNT32 KNHC 081442
    TCPAT2
    BULLETIN
    SUBTROPICAL STORM GABRIELLE ADVISORY NUMBER 3
    NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL072007
    1100 AM EDT SAT SEP 08 2007

    ...GABRIELLE CONTINUES NORTHWESTWARD TOWARD NORTH CAROLINA...
    ...TROPICAL STORM WARNINGS ISSUED...

    AT 11 AM EDT...1500 UTC...A TROPICAL STORM WARNING IS ISSUED FROM
    SURF CITY NORTH CAROLINA NORTHWARD TO THE NORTH CAROLINA/VIRGINIA
    BORDER...INCLUDING THE PAMLICO AND ALBERMARLE SOUNDS. A TROPICAL
    STORM WARNING MEANS THAT TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED
    WITHIN THE WARNING AREA WITHIN THE NEXT 24 HOURS.

    AT 11 AM EDT...A TROPICAL STORM WATCH IS ISSUED FOR PORTIONS OF
    SOUTHERN VIRGINIA FROM NORTH OF THE NORTH CAROLINA/VIRGINIA BORDER
    NORTHWARD TO CAPE CHARLES LIGHT ON THE ATLANTIC COAST AND TO NEW
    POINT COMFORT ALONG CHESAPEAKE BAY.

    AT 11 AM EDT...THE TROPICAL STORM WATCH SOUTH OF CAPE FEAR HAS BEEN
    DISCONTINUED.

    A TROPICAL STORM WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR A PORTION OF THE COAST
    OF NORTH CAROLINA FROM SOUTH OF SURF CITY SOUTHWARD TO CAPE FEAR.

    A TROPICAL STORM WATCH MEANS THAT TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE
    POSSIBLE WITHIN THE WATCH AREA...GENERALLY WITHIN 36 HOURS.

    FOR STORM INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA...INCLUDING POSSIBLE
    INLAND WATCHES AND WARNINGS...PLEASE MONITOR PRODUCTS ISSUED
    BY YOUR LOCAL WEATHER OFFICE.

    AT 1100 AM EDT...1500Z...THE CENTER OF SUBTROPICAL STORM GABRIELLE
    WAS LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 31.5 NORTH...LONGITUDE 74.2 WEST OR ABOUT
    255 MILES...410 KM...SOUTHEAST OF CAPE LOOKOUT NORTH CAROLINA.

    GABRIELLE IS MOVING TOWARD THE NORTHWEST NEAR 10 MPH...17 KM/HR. A
    CONTINUED NORTHWESTWARD MOTION WITH A SLIGHT DECREASE IN FORWARD
    SPEED IS EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 24 HOURS.

    MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 45 MPH...75 KM/HR...WITH HIGHER
    GUSTS. SOME STRENGTHENING IS FORECAST DURING THE NEXT 24 HOURS AS
    GABRIELLE ACQUIRES MORE TROPICAL CHARACTERISTICS.

    WINDS OF 40 MPH EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 115 MILES...185 KM TO THE NORTH
    FROM THE CENTER.

    ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 1009 MB...29.80 INCHES.

    COASTAL STORM SURGE FLOODING OF 2 TO 3 FEET IS POSSIBLE WITHIN THE
    WARNING AREA AS GABRIELLE PASSES NEAR OR OVER THE COAST.

    GABRIELLE IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 2
    TO 4 INCHES ACROSS COASTAL SECTIONS OF NORTH CAROLINA...WITH
    ISOLATED MAXIMUM AMOUNTS OF 6 INCHES.

    REPEATING THE 1100 AM EDT POSITION...31.5 N...74.2 W. MOVEMENT
    TOWARD...NORTHWEST NEAR 10 MPH. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...45 MPH.
    MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1009 MB.

    AN INTERMEDIATE ADVISORY WILL BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL HURRICANE
    CENTER AT 200 PM EDT FOLLOWED BY THE NEXT COMPLETE ADVISORY AT 500
    PM EDT.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 5:40 PM  
    North Carolina under tropical storm warning

    MIAMI, Florida (CNN) -- A tropical storm warning was posted for the North Carolina coast Saturday as Subtropical Storm Gabrielle gathered in the Atlantic, according to the National Hurricane Center.

    The storm could bring heavy rains and high winds to the Outer Banks by Sunday morning, according to an 11 a.m. ET hurricane center advisory.

    A warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected in the area within 24 hours.

    Two to three feet of coastal storm surge flooding is were possible within the warning area, the advisory said.

    Wind gusts could exceed 70 mph (113 kmh), CNN meteorologist Reynolds Wolf said.

    "At this point we do expect it's going to remain below hurricane force, but a lot of things can change between now and Sunday, " he said.

    A tropical storm watch was issued for Virginia's Atlantic Coast and Chesapeake Bay, while previous watches south of Cape Fear, North Carolina, were canceled. See the storm's projected path »

    A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area, generally within 36 hours.

    The advisory said Gabrielle is expected to strengthen slightly as it gains more tropical characteristics.

    The storm's maximum sustained winds were near 45 mph (72 kmh). Gabrielle's center was about 255 miles (410 kilometers) southeast of Cape Lookout, North Carolina. It was moving toward the northwest around 10 mph (17 kmh), the NHC said.


    Gabrielle is expected to stay on the same path for the next 24 hours, the NHC said.

    Coastal sections of North Carolina could get 2 to 4 inches of rain, with some places getting up to 6 inches, the NHC said.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 5:30 PM  
    Subtropical Storm GABRIELLE Public Advisory
    000
    WTNT32 KNHC 081147
    TCPAT2
    BULLETIN
    SUBTROPICAL STORM GABRIELLE INTERMEDIATE ADVISORY NUMBER 2A
    NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL072007
    800 AM EDT SAT SEP 08 2007

    ...GABRIELLE CONTINUES WEST-NORTHWESTWARD TOWARD THE CAROLINAS...

    A TROPICAL STORM WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR PORTIONS OF THE SOUTH
    CAROLINA AND NORTH CAROLINA COAST FROM EDISTO BEACH NORTHWARD TO
    OREGON INLET...INCLUDING THE PAMLICO SOUND. A TROPICAL STORM WATCH
    MEANS THAT TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE POSSIBLE WITHIN THE WATCH
    AREA...GENERALLY WITHIN 36 HOURS.

    A TROPICAL STORM WARNING WILL LIKELY BE REQUIRED FOR A PORTION OF
    THE TROPICAL STORM WATCH AREA LATER TODAY.

    FOR STORM INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA...INCLUDING POSSIBLE
    INLAND WATCHES AND WARNINGS...PLEASE MONITOR PRODUCTS ISSUED
    BY YOUR LOCAL WEATHER OFFICE.

    AT 800 AM AST...1200Z...THE CENTER OF SUBTROPICAL STORM GABRIELLE
    WAS LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 31.2 NORTH...LONGITUDE 73.8 WEST OR ABOUT
    280 MILES...450 KM...SOUTH-SOUTHEAST OF CAPE LOOKOUT NORTH CAROLINA.

    THE STORM IS MOVING TOWARD THE WEST-NORTHWEST NEAR 12 MPH. THIS
    MOTION IS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE FOR THE NEXT 24 HOURS WITH A GRADUAL
    DECREASE IN FORWARD SPEED.

    MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 45 MPH...75 KM/HR...WITH HIGHER
    GUSTS. SLIGHT STRENGTHENING IS EXPECTED AS GABRIELLE ACQUIRES MORE
    TROPICAL CHARACTERISTICS.

    WINDS OF 40 MPH EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 105 MILES...165 KM TO THE NORTH
    OF THE CENTER.

    ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 1011 MB...29.85 INCHES.

    GABRIELLE IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 2
    TO 4 INCHES ACROSS COASTAL SECTIONS OF NORTH CAROLINA...WITH
    ISOLATED MAXIMUM AMOUNTS OF 6 INCHES.

    REPEATING THE 800 AM AST POSITION...31.2 N...73.8 W. MOVEMENT
    TOWARD...WEST-NORTHWEST NEAR 12 MPH. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...45
    MPH. MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1011 MB.

    THE NEXT ADVISORY WILL BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER AT
    1100 AM AST.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 1:50 PM  
    Hurricane death toll hits 130 on Nicaragua coast
    PUERTO CABEZAS, Nicaragua (Reuters) - The number of people killed when Hurricane Felix tore into the border area of Nicaragua and Honduras this week has jumped to at least 130, a Nicaraguan rescue official said on Friday.

    "We have around 130 corpses listed," civil defense official Fabio Benedic said. The dead were mainly Nicaraguan Miskito Indians, including some fishermen whose bodies washed up in Honduras.

    Benedic said about 70 people were believed missing after high waves drowned fishermen, battered coastal villages and devastated islets known as the Miskito Keys.

    A Nicaraguan newspaper said the death toll was 168.

    Hundreds of people did not evacuate before the storm and had only their flimsy wooden shacks for shelter. Some tied themselves to trees or boats in a bid to withstand Felix's 160-mph (256-kph) winds, local fisherman said.

    Nicaraguan police said residents of the Miskito Keys chose to ignore a warning by the navy of the looming storm, a monster Category 5 hurricane when it pounded the area with huge waves and screaming winds.

    "A lot of people reckoned nothing was going to happen," senior policeman Carlos Rodriguez told the online version of La Prensa newspaper.

    A motorboat loaded with 10 dead bodies found floating in the sea arrived at the port of Puerto Cabezas on Thursday evening. Villagers looked on in tears.

    President Daniel Ortega visited Nicaragua's debris-strewn northern coast on Friday as a U.S. Navy ship, U.S. helicopters and a planeload of Venezuelan food aid arrived to help the rescue effort.

    The storm, which brought back memories of Hurricane Mitch, which killed 10,000 people in Central America in 1998, struck the region's Caribbean coast on Tuesday, smashing thousands of wooden homes and flattening trees.

    In Puerto Cabezas, locals chopped up fallen trees and piled trunks on sidewalks to free up blocked roads. Some power poles that had been knocked over were set upright and electricity returned to parts of the port.

    U.S. serviceman Robert Cudd, who is based in Honduras and was working with helicopter relief crews to take water and basis foods to the hurricane-ravaged zone, said the destruction was widespread.

    "Where we were landing, most rooftops were off almost every house," Cudd said.

    Felix hit mainly the turtle-fishing Miskito Indians who live cut off from the world in sparsely populated marshlands dotted with lagoons and crocodile-infested rivers on the coasts of Nicaragua and Honduras.

    Some 35,000 of the turtle-fishing Miskitos live in Honduras and more than 100,000 in Nicaragua.

    Felix came hard on the heels of another Category 5 storm, the most powerful type of hurricane. Last month, Hurricane Dean killed 27 people in the Caribbean and Mexico.

    It was the first time on record two Atlantic hurricanes made landfall as Category 5 storms in the same season, and the fourth time since records began in 1851 that more than one Category 5 had formed in a year.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 1:48 PM  
    Atlantic subtropical storm heads for N. Carolina
    MIAMI (Reuters) - Subtropical Storm Gabrielle churned steadily across the Atlantic toward North Carolina early on Saturday, prompting warnings of rain and strong winds and currents in coastal areas as early as Sunday morning.

    Gabrielle, the seventh named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, was about 315 miles southeast of Cape Lookout, North Carolina, at 5:00 a.m. (0900 GMT), the U.S. National Hurricane Center said.

    The storm packed sustained winds of 45 mph (72 kph) with stronger gusts after being upgraded from a subtropical depression on Friday, and was forecast to strengthen gradually in the next 24 hours, the Miami-based agency said in an advisory.

    "Slight strengthening is expected as Gabrielle acquires tropical characteristics," the center said, adding that it was unlikely to become significantly stronger. Top winds must reach at least 74 mph (119 kph) for a tropical or subtropical storm to become a hurricane.

    A tropical storm watch continued for parts of the South Carolina and North Carolina coasts, as Gabrielle moved west-northwest at around 12 mph (19 kph). Two to six inches

    of rain were forecast for areas of the North Carolina coast, the center said.

    "Coastal residents from Onslow County north along the Outer Banks are urged to take action now to protect any property that may be threatened by tropical storm conditions," the National Weather Service said in a statement late on Friday from Newport, North Carolina.

    "Winds will start to reach tropical storm force along the coast on Sunday morning. At this point winds are expected to reach 45 to 55 mph," it said.

    Increasing swells and high tides would combine to produce dangerous rip currents along area beaches, the NWS said.

    Computer models showed the weather system would most likely loop around to the northeast and cooler waters after reaching the coast.

    It was very unlikely, however, the system could reach the top-rank strength of Hurricanes Dean and Felix, which slammed into Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula in August and Central America this week respectively as Category 5 hurricanes on the five-step Saffir-Simpson scale of hurricane intensity.

    Sea surface temperatures and atmospheric conditions off the U.S. Southeast were nowhere near as favorable for tropical cyclones as in the western Caribbean, where Dean and Felix grew into monster storms, the hurricane center said earlier.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 1:47 PM  
    Subtropical Storm GABRIELLE Public Advisory 2
    000
    WTNT32 KNHC 080839
    TCPAT2
    BULLETIN
    SUBTROPICAL STORM GABRIELLE ADVISORY NUMBER 2
    NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL072007
    500 AM AST SAT SEP 08 2007

    ...GABRIELLE MOVING WEST-NORTHWESTWARD WITH LITTLE CHANGE IN
    STRENGTH...

    A TROPICAL STORM WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR PORTIONS OF THE SOUTH
    CAROLINA AND NORTH CAROLINA COAST FROM EDISTO BEACH NORTHWARD TO
    OREGON INLET...INCLUDING THE PAMLICO SOUND. A TROPICAL STORM WATCH
    MEANS THAT TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE POSSIBLE WITHIN THE WATCH
    AREA...GENERALLY WITHIN 36 HOURS.

    A TROPICAL STORM WARNING COULD BE REQUIRED FOR A PORTION OF THE
    TROPICAL STORM WATCH AREA LATER TODAY.

    FOR STORM INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA...INCLUDING POSSIBLE
    INLAND WATCHES AND WARNINGS...PLEASE MONITOR PRODUCTS ISSUED
    BY YOUR LOCAL WEATHER OFFICE.

    AT 500 AM AST...0900Z...THE CENTER OF SUBTROPICAL STORM GABRIELLE
    WAS LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 30.9 NORTH...LONGITUDE 73.5 WEST OR ABOUT
    315 MILES...505 KM...SOUTHEAST OF CAPE LOOKOUT NORTH CAROLINA.

    THE STORM IS MOVING TOWARD THE WEST-NORTHWEST NEAR 12 MPH. THIS
    MOTION IS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE FOR THE NEXT 24 HOURS WITH A GRADUAL
    DECREASE IN FORWARD SPEED.

    MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 45 MPH...75 KM/HR...WITH HIGHER
    GUSTS. SLIGHT STRENGTHENING IS EXPECTED AS GABRIELLE ACQUIRES
    TROPICAL CHARACTERISTICS.

    WINDS OF 40 MPH EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 105 MILES...165 KM TO THE NORTH
    OF THE CENTER.

    ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 1011 MB...29.85 INCHES.

    GABRIELLE IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 2
    TO 4 INCHES ACROSS COASTAL SECTIONS OF NORTH CAROLINA...WITH
    ISOLATED MAXIMUM AMOUNTS OF 6 INCHES.

    REPEATING THE 500 AM AST POSITION...30.9 N...73.5 W. MOVEMENT
    TOWARD...WEST-NORTHWEST NEAR 12 MPH. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...45
    MPH. MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1011 MB.

    AN INTERMEDIATE ADVISORY WILL BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL HURRICANE
    CENTER AT 800 AM AST FOLLOWED BY THE NEXT COMPLETE ADVISORY AT 1100
    AM AST.
    (NOAA)
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 10:11 AM  
    Subtropical Storm Gabrielle Forms

    MIAMI — Subtropical Storm Gabrielle formed Friday off the southeast U.S. coast, and a tropical storm watch was issued for portions of the South Carolina and North Carolina coast.

    At 11 p.m, Gabrielle had top sustained winds near 45 mph and was centered about 385 miles southeast of Cape Lookout, N.C., the National Hurricane Center said. It was moving west northwest near 10 mph and was expected to continue along the same path during the next 24 hours.

    A tropical storm watch was issued for portions of the South Carolina and North Carolina coast from Edisto Beach northward to Oregon Inlet, including Pamlico Sound. A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area within the next 36 hours.

    Subtropical systems are hybrid weather formations that are typically weaker than hurricanes. They share characteristics of tropical storms, which get their power from warm ocean waters, and more normal storms that form when warm and cold fronts collide.

    Gabrielle is the second subtropical storm to form this year. Subtropical Storm Andrea formed in May about 150 miles northeast of Daytona Beach, before the June 1 official start to hurricane season. Andrea skirted the southern Atlantic coast but caused minimal damage.

    THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

    MIAMI (AP) — Subtropical Storm Gabrielle formed Friday off the southeast U.S. coast, and a tropical storm watch was issued for portions of the South Carolina and North Carolina coast.

    At 11 p.m, Gabrielle had top sustained winds near 45 mph and was centered about 385 miles southeast of Cape Lookout, N.C., the National Hurricane Center said. It was moving west northwest near 10 mph and was expected to continue along the same path during the next 24 hours.

    A tropical storm watch was issued for portions of the South Carolina and North Carolina coast from Edisto Beach northward to Oregon Inlet, including Pamlico Sound. A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area within the next 36 hours.(Storm2007)
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 10:07 AM  
    Atlantic SPECIAL TROPICAL DISTURBANCE STATEMENT
    Friday, September 7, 2007

    Atlantic SPECIAL TROPICAL DISTURBANCE STATEMENT
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    000
    WONT41 KNHC 071242
    DSAAT
    SPECIAL TROPICAL DISTURBANCE STATEMENT
    NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
    845 AM EDT FRI SEP 07 2007

    SATELLITE IMAGES INDICATE THAT THE AREA OF LOW PRESSURE LOCATED
    BETWEEN BERMUDA AND THE SOUTHEAST U.S. COAST HAS BECOME BETTER
    ORGANIZED OVERNIGHT. UPPER-LEVEL WINDS ARE BECOMING MORE FAVORABLE
    FOR ADDITIONAL DEVELOPMENT...AND A TROPICAL DEPRESSION COULD FORM
    LATER TODAY. AN AIR FORCE RESERVE HURRICANE HUNTER AIRCRAFT IS
    SCHEDULED TO INVESTIGATE THIS SYSTEM THIS AFTERNOON. THE LOW IS
    FORECAST TO MOVE GENERALLY WESTWARD OR NORTHWESTWARD DURING THE
    NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS...AND INTERESTS ALONG THE EAST COAST OF THE
    UNITED STATES SHOULD CLOSELY MONITOR THE PROGRESS OF THIS SYSTEM.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 4:48 PM  
    Gabby:Will she or won't she

    The National Hurricane Center is sounding way less than bullish about that disorganized, drifting disturbance northeast of the Bahamas, which might eventually turn into Tropical Storm or Hurricane Gabrielle — unless it doesn’t:

    “Shower activity associated with the non-tropical area of low pressure about 350 miles southwest of Bermuda remains disorganized. While upper-level winds are unfavorable for development … they could become more favorable over the next couple of days … and there is still some potential for this system to become a tropical cyclone.”
    Meanwhile, AccuWeather predicted earlier today that a Category 1 or Category 2 hurricane will hit the Carolinas on Sunday morning, and has published this graphic calling the disturbance “Gabrielle-to-Be”:


    The graphic came with a disclaimer this afternoon:

    “What you see here is not etched in stone. It’s simply our preliminary assessment as to where Gabrielle will go once the storm has developed. Could the storm be stronger than shown? Absolutely, especially with all the very warm water that it has to travel across. On the other hand, might there be no storm at all? We can’t rule that out either, though that appears to be the least likely scenario.”
    But elsewhere, the Pennsylvania-based company’s forecast was more definite:


    “By Friday, the low is expected to reach tropical storm strength and is likely to be named Gabrielle. The Hurricane Center meteorologists are forecasting the storm will make landfall on the Carolina coastline Sunday morning as a Category 1 or perhaps a Category 2 hurricane.”

    By “Hurricane Center,” it means the AccuWeather Hurricane Center, not the NHC.

    This rivalry between the private service and the feds has played out before, including last week, when AccuWeather declared the creation of Tropical Depression 6 (the future Felix) several hours before the National Hurricane Center made the official announcement. Some folks in the hurricane blogosphere were less than thrilled when that happened, saying the discrepancy between the two could have confused the public.

    Anyway, as for “some potential” vs. “Gabrielle-to-be,” I guess we’ll know in a few days who was right.

    6:20 p.m. update: AccuWeather’s forecast is now a bit toned down. Instead of talking about Category 1 or Category 2, it now says that “the storm will make landfall on the Carolina coastline later Sunday or Monday, perhaps as a hurricane.”
    (eye on the Storm2007)
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 11:49 AM  
    Typhoon batters Tokyo, moves on

    TOKYO (Reuters) - A typhoon pounded Tokyo and surrounding areas on Friday, killing at least one man and snarling transport and power supplies, before weakening and moving north.

    The typhoon, the biggest to hit Tokyo since October 2002, brought down record rainfall in many parts of the capital, but by afternoon it had weakened to a tropical storm.

    Rescue workers searched for homeless people swept away by a swollen Tama river as they slept in shacks along its banks in western Tokyo.

    Many were winched to safety by helicopters, although local officials said they were not sure how many others had been living along the river bank. Kyodo news agency said 29 people had been rescued.

    By noon, the worst of Typhoon Fitow, whose name means "beautiful fragrant flower" in a Micronesian language, had passed to the north of Tokyo.

    The flood warning for the Tama river was lifted and train service in the capital had mostly returned to normal.

    The eye of the storm was near the city of Akita, some 450 km (280 miles) north of the capital, bringing with it winds gusting to 90 km (56 miles) an hour as of 3 p.m. (2 a.m. EDT), the Japan Meteorological Agency said.

    It had picked up speed and was heading north at 50 km (30 miles) an hour.

    Apple growers in the path of the storm hurried to pick their crops as the storm approached.

    "If the apples get damaged by falling, all the effort and cost up until now will be wasted," a farmer told NHK as he harvested apples five days ahead of schedule.

    During the night, a 76-year-old man was killed by a falling tree northwest of Tokyo, local police said. At least 60 people had been injured and another was missing, NHK television said.

    Bedraggled commuters struggled to get to work on Friday with some expressways closed and trains, including high-speed bullet services, delayed or cancelled on many lines. About 10 million people commute to work or school in Tokyo.

    Some travelers blamed climate change.

    "It's rare for Tokyo to get hit directly like this," said Miho Kaido, a 36-year-old tourist who came by taxi to Tokyo station to catch a bus to Aomori in northern Japan. "The worst thing is that the trains are not running. I think global warming is having an impact and making the weather more severe."

    About 23,600 households were still without electricity in Tokyo on Friday afternoon, NHK said.

    In central Tokyo, tree branches and leaves littered the streets and broken umbrellas were snagged in fences and under parked cars after the stormy night, as clean-up crews moved methodically in the rain to remove the debris.

    In July, a typhoon killed three people and injured more than 70 when it hit the southern island of Kyushu and moved along the country's eastern coastline.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 11:42 AM  
    US military relief assessment team in storm-hit Nicaragua
    Thursday, September 6, 2007
    WASHINGTON (AFP) - The US military has sent a team to Nicaragua to assess conditions in the wake of deadly Hurricane Felix and plan for humanitarian assistance, the Pentagon said Thursday.

    The USS Wasp, a helicopter carrier, is on standby in waters near Nicaragua in case it is needed, Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman said.

    A high speed vessel has also been dispatched to the US Navy base at Guantanamo, Cuba to pick up emergency relief supplies -- food, blankets, sheeting and hygiene kits -- that could be used, he said.

    He said the assessment team was sent to Nicaragua in response to a request for assistance by the government.

    The death toll from the devastating hurricane continued to rise Thursday. Scores of people have been killed and tens of thousands displaced in Nicaragua and Honduras.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 11:04 PM  
    Central America on flooding alert after storms
    BILWI, Nicaragua (AFP) - Nicaragua, Honduras and Mexico geared up for flooding from rain-swollen rivers Thursday in the wake of two devastating hurricanes that left at least 80 victims dead and scores more missing.

    Nicaragua and Honduras in a joint death toll Thursday, said that Hurricane Felix killed at least 71 people in their two countries.

    In Mexico, meanwhile, nine people were killed in the wake of Hurricane Henriette, which swept across Baja California's popular Cabo tourist areas before plowing into the country's northern regions, slowing as it crossed the US border. Some 5,000 people remained in shelters in Mexico.

    In Central America low-lying areas were on high alert against flooding as rivers continued to rise following super-storm Felix, which blasted into Nicaragua's northern Mosquito Coast Tuesday, killing at least 38 and leaving 50,000 homeless.

    The storm at its peak Tuesday reached the highest possible category five strength on the Saffir-Simpson scale.

    The European Union announced it would send 1.3 million dollars in emergency aid to help the relief effort in Nicaragua.

    Nicaragua's disaster chief Ramon Arnesto Sistema said the death toll was "likely to rise," with some 120 people missing from the Miskito Cays along the coast of the impoverished North Atlantic Autonomous Region.

    An aircraft with tonnes of food, blankets and medication landed late Wednesday in Bilwi, the regional capital, and a Venezuelan cargo plane was due to arrive later Thursday.

    The World Food Program delivered 4.5 tonnes of aid to the Nicaraguan government, while neighboring El Salvador and Honduras also sent assistance.

    The population worst hit by the storm was without help for a full day due to the remoteness of the jungle region.

    The bodies of 24 native Miskito Nicaraguans, whose fishing boat had capsized, were found near the Caribbean coast of Honduras in the wake of Felix, an official told reporters Thursday.

    "This morning I was told that a boat was recovered with 24 bodies, 21 men and three women," government representative for the Gracias a Dios region, Carolina Echeverria said.

    Meanwhile, President Manuel Zelaya said that he had been told of dozens of Miskitos killed, adding that there were "128 more missing, many of whom are likely to have drowned."

    In the wealthy Valle de Sula farming and industrial region of northwest Honduras, the military, Red Cross and rescue officials pressed thousands of reluctant inhabitants of some 20 local villages to evacuate their homes ahead of surging waters in the Ulua and Chamelecon rivers.

    "The rivers are rising, it is almost certain that they will flood, and we cannot run the risk that there will be deaths because we did not take the situation seriously," El Progresso mayor Jose Martinez told AFP.

    On an all-terrain vehicle, Ramon Villeda, head of the firefighters at the San Pedro Sula airport, drove along the river banks to study the situation, calling on residents to leave their homes.

    "It is necessary to leave the area, without a doubt. The people will possibly be able to return to their homes safe and sound on Friday, when the danger has passed," he said.

    In Guatemala, authorities declared a red alert in Izabal City, some 300 kilometers northeast of the capital, where residents have been evacuated over worries of flooding.

    Flooding alerts were also sounded, and evacuations launched in El Salvador and Mexico's southern Chiapas state.

    Two storm victims died in Mexico and one was missing in Guaymas, on the Sonora state coast, adding to seven who died earlier when Henriette swept up Mexico's southern Pacific coast.
    posted by Moderator Image Hosted by ImageShack.us Londen time 11:03 PM  
    Hurricane Felix death toll: 48 and predicted to rise
    (CNN) -- Rescuers searched Thursday for survivors of powerful Hurricane Felix, which a Nicaraguan official said has claimed 48 lives, a death toll sure to climb higher.

    Casualty reports have yet to come from at least 70 percent of villages and towns along Nicaragua's swampy, jungle coast where Felix slammed ashore with 160 mph winds on Tuesday, said disaster official Jorge Ramon Arnesto Soza.

    Soza, the executive secretary of the National System for the Prevention, Mitigation and Attention of Disasters, said those expected reports are surly to raise the current death toll, which he described as "very low."

    Authorities rescued 52 Miskito Indians who lived on low-lying reefs and keys off the coast said Honduras congresswoman Carolina Echeverria. They survived the hurricane's deluge by grasping floating objects until help arrived, she said.

    Bodies that could not be recovered were seen floating in the water, said Echeverria.

    Survivors who were fished from the sea told harrowing stories. See dramatic photos of the monster storm's aftermath »

    Dario Zacarias, 21, told Managua's La Prensa newspaper that he'd floated in the sea, lashed to a buoy, until he was picked up by a fishing boat and taken to Puerto Cabezas.

    "My captain died, (saying) 'Save yourselves. Tell my wife that I couldn't hold out any longer,' " Zacarias said. "I had to let a woman go who had died, too." Watch how officials fear deadly mudslides »

    In addition to the 52 survivors, an undetermined number of others who were aboard a boat were also rescued, she said.

    Nine of the first 52 were found unconscious, "but I just heard from the hospital that they are out of danger," said Echeverria, who represents a district along Nicaragua's border with Honduras.
    "Compared with our brothers in Nicaragua, our situation is less serious," she said. "Houses damaged, some flooding but, thankfully, no one has died."

    The storm barreled ashore about 7:45 a.m. ET Tuesday near the Honduras-Nicaragua border as a Category 5 storm, the most intense on the Saffir-Simpson scale of intensity used by meteorologists.

    About 11,000 Miskito Indians in the isolated region did not evacuate in advance of the storm. Honduran officials had trouble getting to the remote region, but did manage to evacuate more than 3,100, according to regional army commander Col. Carlos Edgar Mejia of the 115th Infantry Brigade.

    Felix tore the roofs from buildings in Puerto Cabezas and damaged the town's hospital and airport, Nicaraguan Civil Defense officials said.

    The United Nations' World Food Program said in a statement the hurricane ripped the roof off a hotel where staff was staying and destroyed a food aid warehouse.

    Nearly 80 percent of Nicaraguans live below the poverty level, many in ill-constructed homes.

    Felix was the second Category 5 storm to hit the region this year, marking the first recorded instance of two such storms making landfall in a single hurricane season.


    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration began keeping records in 1886.

    Hurricane Dean, also a Category 5 storm, slammed into Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula two weeks ago.
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    The tropical cyclone data presented at this site are intended to convey only general information on current storms and must not be used to make life or death decisions or decisions relating to the protection of property: the data may not be accurate. If you are in the path of a storm you should be listening to official information sources. These data have no official status and should not be used for emergency response decision-making under any circumstances

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